WAAW

Leading Japanese Pharmaceutical Company, Shionogi, Officially Opens Doors of Its New European Headquarters in Amsterdam

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, November 23, 2022

SHIONOGI B.V., the European subsidiary of SHIONOGI & Co., Ltd. (Head Office: Osaka, Japan; hereafter "Shionogi"), officially opened the doors to its new European Headquarters in Herengracht, Amsterdam, today, marking the next stage of growth for the Japanese pharmaceutical company.

Key Points: 
  • SHIONOGI B.V., the European subsidiary of SHIONOGI & Co., Ltd. (Head Office: Osaka, Japan; hereafter "Shionogi"), officially opened the doors to its new European Headquarters in Herengracht, Amsterdam, today, marking the next stage of growth for the Japanese pharmaceutical company.
  • European CEO, Huw Tippett said: The decision to open our new headquarters in Amsterdam was an easy one for the business.
  • Amsterdam is a great city with a thriving life science community across both biopharmaceuticals and medical technology.
  • The new office adds further strength to Shionogis European capabilities, as we continue on our ambitious growth journey.

Statement from Dr. Theresa Tam, Chief Public Health Officer of Canada - World Antimicrobial Awareness Week, November 18 to 24, 2022

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, November 24, 2022

OTTAWA, ON, Nov. 24, 2022 /CNW/ - From November 18 to 24, 2022, we recognized the annual World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW).

Key Points: 
  • OTTAWA, ON, Nov. 24, 2022 /CNW/ - From November 18 to 24, 2022, we recognized the annual World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW).
  • This year's campaign called for cross-sectoral collaboration to preserve the efficacy of these important medications and to strengthen preventive measures addressing antimicrobial resistance(AMR).
  • AMR is already having a significant burden on human health, our health care system, and the economy.
  • In Canada, antimicrobial use in humans continues to decrease which is good news, however inappropriate prescribing is still common.

New study reveals the extent of antibiotic misuse for a common sore throat, fuelling the 3rd leading cause of death worldwide

Retrieved on: 
Friday, November 18, 2022

Upper respiratory tract infections represent the leading cause for global antibiotic misuse in adults.

Key Points: 
  • Upper respiratory tract infections represent the leading cause for global antibiotic misuse in adults.
  • The STAR study findings suggest that a misunderstanding of how to treat sore throats is contributing to antibiotic overuse.
  • GRIP is calling for awareness and education on appropriate antibiotic use and urging young people to ask questions to help fight antibiotic resistance."
  • For more information or interviews with GRIP experts Sabiha Essack & Martin Duerden: [email protected] , +44 20 8154 6389
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New study reveals the extent of antibiotic misuse for a common sore throat, fuelling the 3rd leading cause of death worldwide

Retrieved on: 
Friday, November 18, 2022

Upper respiratory tract infections represent the leading cause for global antibiotic misuse in adults.

Key Points: 
  • Upper respiratory tract infections represent the leading cause for global antibiotic misuse in adults.
  • The STAR study findings suggest that a misunderstanding of how to treat sore throats is contributing to antibiotic overuse.
  • GRIP is calling for awareness and education on appropriate antibiotic use and urging young people to ask questions to help fight antibiotic resistance."
  • For more information or interviews with GRIP experts Sabiha Essack & Martin Duerden: [email protected] , +44 20 8154 6389

Statement from the Minister of Health on Canada's Support for International Cooperation on Antimicrobial Resistance

Retrieved on: 
Monday, October 17, 2022

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) costs our healthcare system $1.4B every year and is an urgent and growing threat to global health, with wide-spread socio-economic impacts.

Key Points: 
  • Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) costs our healthcare system $1.4B every year and is an urgent and growing threat to global health, with wide-spread socio-economic impacts.
  • Globally, AMR is associated with close to five million annual deaths, more than HIV/AIDS, malaria, or breast cancer.
  • Today, I am pleased to announce we are joining international partners with a $300,000 contribution to help address AMR.
  • In addition to our global cooperation, there are also individual level actions we can take to help address this public health threat.

Experts warn that post-COVID hygiene lethargy could put millions at risk of fatal infections due to antimicrobial resistance

Retrieved on: 
Friday, November 19, 2021

As we continue to address the impact of COVID-19, there is an even greater public health threat which must be tackled, AMR.

Key Points: 
  • As we continue to address the impact of COVID-19, there is an even greater public health threat which must be tackled, AMR.
  • Last month the WHO launched its report on the state of the world's hand hygiene, outlining the importance of hand hygiene in preventing infections and reducing the burden ofAMR through extending the life of antimicrobials (e.g.
  • Behaviours such as handwashing have the potential to reduce disease transmission, as experienced with COVID-19 and should be encouraged post-pandemic".
  • Adopting everyday hygiene practices can reduce the risk of common infections by up to 50% and offers a framework for reducing antibiotic prescribing, minimising opportunities for antibiotic resistant bacteria to form.

Experts warn that post-COVID hygiene lethargy could put millions at risk of fatal infections due to antimicrobial resistance

Retrieved on: 
Friday, November 19, 2021

LONDON, Nov. 19, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- With over 5 million deaths worldwide, COVID-19 has imposed a significant burden on societies and healthcare systems around the world. As we continue to address the impact of COVID-19, there is an even greater public health threat which must be tackled, AMR. The importance of hygiene's role in breaking the chain of infection has been demonstrated during the COVID-19 pandemic, however GHC experts fear that we are witnessing hygiene lethargy as we transition into a post-COVID world, exacerbating the threat of AMR.

Key Points: 
  • The Global Hygiene Council (GHC) are calling on us to practice good hygiene, such as handwashing, to prevent the spread of infectious diseases and reduce the impact of antimicrobial resistance (AMR).
  • LONDON, Nov. 19, 2021 /PRNewswire/ -- With over 5 million deaths worldwide, COVID-19 has imposed a significant burden on societies and healthcare systems around the world.
  • As we continue to address the impact of COVID-19, there is an even greater public health threat which must be tackled, AMR.
  • Behaviours such as handwashing have the potential to reduce disease transmission, as experienced with COVID-19 and should be encouraged post-pandemic".