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EQS-News: PJSC Mechel : Mechel Reports Changes in Management

Wednesday, September 15, 2021 - 11:03am

Moscow, Russia - September 15, 2021 - Mechel PAO (MOEX: MTLR, NYSE: MTL), one of the leading Russian mining and metals companies, reports changes in the company's management, including introduction of a new position - that of first deputy chief executive officer.

Key Points: 
  • Moscow, Russia - September 15, 2021 - Mechel PAO (MOEX: MTLR, NYSE: MTL), one of the leading Russian mining and metals companies, reports changes in the company's management, including introduction of a new position - that of first deputy chief executive officer.
  • Apart from overseeing the bloc dealing with sales of Mechel Group's output, he will manage the procurement department as well.
  • Prior to his current appointment, Maxim Zhirgalov was Mechel PAO's deputy chief executive officer for operational efficiency since February 2021.
  • In 2008-2011, he was director of Mechel Management Company's forgings and stampings sales department.

According to Silicide Spherules From Space, Catastrophic Cosmic Impacts on Earth are Far More Frequent Than Scientists Thought

Tuesday, August 24, 2021 - 1:32pm

Multiple similar finds of silicide spherules worldwide indicate that large-scale impacts capable of delivering ejecta to space have been more frequent in geological history than suggested by known evidence of cratering.

Key Points: 
  • Multiple similar finds of silicide spherules worldwide indicate that large-scale impacts capable of delivering ejecta to space have been more frequent in geological history than suggested by known evidence of cratering.
  • The reported data shows that silicide spherules have condensed from vapor plume ejected beyond the atmosphere and have ablated on atmospheric reentry at a cosmic velocity exceeding 13 km/s.
  • The chemical composition of iron silicide spherules is closely corresponding to the 1893K 1154K temperature span of condensation sequences predicted for carbon-rich gas.
  • Iron silicide spherules indicate that cosmic impacts of catastrophic magnitude are far more frequent in geological history than suggested by evidence of cratering discovered so far.