Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology

Value Research Center, Kyoto at the UNGA77 Science Summit

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, September 21, 2022

Prof. Philip Sugai, Director of the Value Research Center (VRC) at Doshisha University, Kyoto will share how he and his research team have integrated and synthesized many of the world's top ESG and sustainability reporting frameworks into The Value Model, a goal-based, objective, and transparent model for measuring stakeholder value at this year's UN General Assembly Science Summit.

Key Points: 
  • Prof. Philip Sugai, Director of the Value Research Center (VRC) at Doshisha University, Kyoto will share how he and his research team have integrated and synthesized many of the world's top ESG and sustainability reporting frameworks into The Value Model, a goal-based, objective, and transparent model for measuring stakeholder value at this year's UN General Assembly Science Summit.
  • The theme of this year's Science Summit is "The Role of Science and Innovation in Attaining the United Nations' Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs)."
  • The 8th annual Science Summit is being held live in New York and online and it is free to attend.
  • Details of the Valuing Value workshop are here:
    Registration for Science Summit at UNGA77 (free) is here:
    The Value Research Center (VRC) at Doshisha University in Kyoto, Japan was established in November 2021.

Researchers embark on mission to find all the world's ants

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Thursday, August 4, 2022

MIAMI, Aug. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ --A team of international researchers is shining a light on the often understudied "little things that run the world" ants.

Key Points: 
  • MIAMI, Aug. 3, 2022 /PRNewswire/ --A team of international researchers is shining a light on the often understudied "little things that run the world" ants.
  • With the help of cutting-edge technology, the researchers created a first-of-its-kind global biodiversity map to begin answering a long unanswered question about where ants can be found across the globe.
  • Ants, thought to be nature's most industrious insects, often toil away, carrying out many jobs and juggling important responsibilities.
  • While there's still much to learn about them, what's clear is that the world wouldn't be the world without ants.

New Articles for May Issue of "KIZUNA," Official E-magazine of Japanese Government

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Friday, June 3, 2022

- Japan Stands with Ukraine: Keeping Education Going for Students

Key Points: 
  • - Japan Stands with Ukraine: Keeping Education Going for Students
    In response to Russia's aggression against Ukraine, Japan is providing wide-ranging support for Ukraine.
  • Since its reversion to Japan from U.S. control, Okinawa has leveraged its local assets as remote islands for growth.
  • A Japanese researcher who made a breakthrough in progress toward practical use of quantum computers talks about the technology's outlook.
  • Mohamed Omer Abdin, a visually impaired Sudanese man in Japan, has been making efforts to support the world's similarly afflicted.

Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University Deploys AMD EPYC™ Processors with Over 2 Petaflops of Computing Power Dedicated to Scientific Research

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, October 1, 2020

TOKYO, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University ( OIST ) , announced the deployment of AMD EPYC 7702 processors for use in a new, high performance computing system.

Key Points: 
  • TOKYO, Oct. 01, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today, AMD (NASDAQ: AMD) and Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University ( OIST ) , announced the deployment of AMD EPYC 7702 processors for use in a new, high performance computing system.
  • The EPYC processor-based supercomputer will deliver the 2.36 petaflops of computing power OIST plans to use for scientific research at the University.
  • The Scientific Computing & Data Analysis Section (SCDA) of OIST plans to implement the new supercomputer for supporting OIST computationally intensive research ranging from bioinformatics, computational neuroscience, and physics.
  • Key factors of OISTs selection of the AMD EPYC processors included superior cost-performance, memory/PCIe bandwidth, and high core counts per server.