School

Funds For Learning Commends FCC Approval of E-rate Program Expansion to Support Off-Premises Wi-Fi Hotspots

Retrieved on: 
Friday, July 19, 2024

EDMOND, Okla., July 18, 2024 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- On July 18, 2024, the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) voted to approve an expansion of the E-rate program to include support for off-premises use of Wi-Fi hotspots and wireless internet services. This initiative intends to ensure that students and library patrons can access essential educational resources, even outside of school and library buildings, by providing funding for Wi-Fi hotspots and wireless internet services.

Key Points: 
  • The approval of this initiative represents a forward-thinking approach to the E-rate program, aligning it with the realities of today's educational landscape.
  • Funds For Learning is committed to supporting this expansion and will continue to advocate for policies that enhance the effectiveness of the E-rate program."
  • Additional details on the E-rate Program Expansion include:
    Funding Allocation: The program will allocate funds based on a per-student and per-library location budget, ensuring equitable distribution of Wi-Fi hotspots and services.
  • E-rate Program Expansion Webinar Details:
    The Funds For Learning team is saving time for a handful of interviews on this topic over the next few days.

Global Online Exam Proctoring Report 2024: A $1.993 Billion Market by 2029 - Analysis by Live, Recorded and Advanced Automated Proctoring - Forecasts to 2029 - ResearchAndMarkets.com

Retrieved on: 
Friday, July 19, 2024

The "The Global Online Exam Proctoring Market: Analysis by Type (Live Online Proctoring, Recorded Proctoring and Advanced Automated Proctoring), End Users (Schools & Universities, Enterprises, Government), Region Size, Trends and Forecast up to 2029" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.

Key Points: 
  • The "The Global Online Exam Proctoring Market: Analysis by Type (Live Online Proctoring, Recorded Proctoring and Advanced Automated Proctoring), End Users (Schools & Universities, Enterprises, Government), Region Size, Trends and Forecast up to 2029" report has been added to ResearchAndMarkets.com's offering.
  • The global online exam proctoring market was valued at US$836.43 million in 2023.
  • Impact Analysis of COVID-19 and Way Forward:
    The emergence of COVID-19 was favorable towards the growth of the global online exam proctoring market.
  • The global online exam proctoring market is highly fragmented in nature, with the presence of number of companies that provides varied online exam proctoring.

Meditation can be harmful – and can even make mental health problems worse

Retrieved on: 
Friday, July 19, 2024

Since mindfulness it’s something you can practice at home for free, it often sounds like the perfect tonic for stress and mental health issues.

Key Points: 
  • Since mindfulness it’s something you can practice at home for free, it often sounds like the perfect tonic for stress and mental health issues.
  • It also details cognitive anomalies associated with episodes of psychosis, dissociation and depersonalisation (when people feel the world is “unreal”).
  • In the past eight years there has been a surge of scientific research in this area.
  • The study tested more than 8,000 children (aged 11-14) across 84 schools in the UK from 2016 to 2018.
  • Its results showed that mindfulness failed to improve the mental wellbeing of children compared to a control group, and may even have had detrimental effects on those who were at risk of mental health problems.

Ethical implications

Young Voices Scale New Heights at 2024 Global Gen Z Dialogue at Mount Tai

Retrieved on: 
Friday, July 19, 2024

Participants, including eleven Gen Z representatives from the US, Germany, South Korea, and Iran, embarked on a captivating tour of Tai'an.

Key Points: 
  • Participants, including eleven Gen Z representatives from the US, Germany, South Korea, and Iran, embarked on a captivating tour of Tai'an.
  • The itinerary included a challenging yet rewarding climb to the peak of Mount Tai, offering breathtaking panoramic views.
  • Mikhail Milko, a Russian economics student at Peking University, recounted his memorable climbs of Mount Tai in both sunny and rainy conditions.
  • The dialogue extended beyond personal experiences, inviting experts to delve into the cultural and spiritual significance of Mount Tai.

Entegris Joined by White House Representatives and Colorado Governor to Celebrate $75 Million CHIPS Act Funding Announcement

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

Entegris (Nasdaq: ENTG), a global leader in advanced materials science, today celebrated its award of CHIPS Act funding at its Colorado Springs construction site with several federal, state, and local government guests in attendance.

Key Points: 
  • Entegris (Nasdaq: ENTG), a global leader in advanced materials science, today celebrated its award of CHIPS Act funding at its Colorado Springs construction site with several federal, state, and local government guests in attendance.
  • View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240718730492/en/
    Federal, state, and local government guests joined Entegris to celebrate funding under the Chips Act.
  • This funding would support the development of Entegris’ state-of-the-art facility in Colorado Springs designed to create products critical to the future of semiconductor manufacturing in the U.S.
  • Through the President’s CHIPS and Science Act, we’re teaming with companies like Entegris to strengthen the semiconductor supply chain here at home.

Friday essay: public ‘pash ons’ and angry dads – personal politics started with consciousness-raising feminists. Now, everyone’s doing it

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

Women shared personal stories they had never told in public before, building trust, forging sisterhood.

Key Points: 
  • Women shared personal stories they had never told in public before, building trust, forging sisterhood.
  • While most of the media were excluded from the gathering, a journalist from the Australian Women’s Weekly was permitted to attend.
  • The event’s goal was to transform personal stories into shared knowledge and ballast for political action.
  • How, then, should we assess the impact and legacy of personal politics?

Making the personal political

  • The phrase, and later slogan, “the personal is political” is often credited to US feminist Carol Hanisch.
  • “One of the first things we discover in these groups is that personal problems are political problems,” she wrote.
  • “The personal is political” became a call for feminists, as well as gay and lesbian activists, to develop theories about the structures and dynamics that limited their everyday lives, and a political practice to transform them.
  • They were suspicious this could be a foundation for political action, dismissing it as merely “navel gazing”.
  • Women’s stories about their own lives and experiences were becoming an expected element of political debate.

Pursuing legal change

  • After very limited reforms in South Australia in 1972, which provided a legal defence of privacy to the crime of sodomy, more expansive reforms were passed in that state in 1975.
  • Sometimes, they performed their intimate lives in public to campaign for change.
  • Since 1959, laws had required the attribution of fault in the legal dissolution of a marriage.
  • Feminist activism had revealed the home could be a space of profound oppression, and argued for a legal framework that did not reinforce these inequalities.
  • Some publicly funded Catholic hospitals will not provide terminations, producing what activists described last year as a postcode lottery for legal healthcare.

Strange political bedfellows

  • In relation to that 1979 debate, for example, more than 10% of all the petitions submitted to parliament that year concerned abortion.
  • Parliamentarians also complained their offices had ground to a halt under a deluge of phone calls and letters from concerned constituents.
  • It sometimes produced strange political bedfellows, as Labor and Liberal MPs voted together.
  • Our research reveals a political culture less determined by party divides than we might expect: one often punctured and animated by questions of intimate, family and sexual life.

Intimate suffering as a political tool

  • In the 1980s, the intimate languages of grief and suffering often reinforced political claims during the HIV/AIDS epidemic.
  • But marginalised and oppressed groups who had been excluded from full citizenship and participation in political debate were not the only ones to mobilise stories of intimate distress to seek change.
  • Groups that sought very different legal reforms were also using personal stories for political effect.

Family Court violence

  • In the early 1980s, the Family Court, its judges and their families became the target of lethal violence.
  • Between 1980 and 1985, a series of bombings and shootings resulted in the death of one Family Court judge and another judge’s wife.
  • In 1984, the Family Court in Parramatta was bombed, though in this case no one was injured.
  • These are too often the bitter fruits, the luckless harvest of so many people who have been through the process of the Family Court.
  • The “cause” of this violence, whether directed towards judges or families, was widely represented as a Family Court system that did not attend to men’s needs.

Men’s sheds, Safe Schools and funding

  • A very different fate befell the Safe Schools program, a health education project developed to better support gender- and sexually diverse children and teenagers.
  • At a Perth rally in 2016, 15-year-old Oscar, a self-identified LGBTIQA+ Australian, explained why safe schools are needed.
  • A formal review commissioned by the Commonwealth government found that Safe Schools material was effective and appropriate.
  • And yet, Commonwealth funding was discontinued after 2017, although some state governments stepped in, either to directly replace the federal funding or to fund programs that reflected the principles of Safe Schools.
  • Both men’s sheds and the Safe Schools program provide safe spaces and address poor mental health.

What next?

What happens when you pay Year 7 students to do better on NAPLAN? We found out

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

Next month, we are expecting the results from the annual NAPLAN tests, which students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9 sat earlier this year.

Key Points: 
  • Next month, we are expecting the results from the annual NAPLAN tests, which students in years 3, 5, 7 and 9 sat earlier this year.
  • For example, last year only two-thirds of students met the national standards, with headlines of “failed NAPLAN expectations”.
  • In our new study, Year 7 students were given small financial rewards if they reached personalised goals in their NAPLAN tests.

Who did we study?

  • But we wanted to explore this to better understand students’ motivation and effort while taking a test.
  • In our study, we used data on real students doing NAPLAN tests.
  • The students were at a coeducational public high school in South East Queensland and mostly came from socio-educationally disadvantaged backgrounds.

How were the students rewarded?

  • Before each test, students were given a personalised target score, based on their Year 5 NAPLAN results.
  • There was then a different approach for each test: in the conventions of language(spelling, grammar and punctuation) test, students were given no incentive to reach their target score.
  • in the readingand numeracytests, students were either given a “proportional” incentive or a “social” incentive.

We found scores improved with rewards

  • Our research found scores improved when students were offered a reward, particularly for tests done in 2017 and 2018.
  • When compared with the gains in conventions of language test (where students were not given any incentive), the average scores improved by as much as 1.37% in writing, 0.81% in reading and 0.28% in numeracy.
  • While these may not seem like huge overall gains, our analysis showed the rewards led to gains that went above and beyond the gains seen at similar schools (that didn’t offer incentives).

What reward worked best?

  • This is perhaps not surprising, as the fixed incentive paid the highest reward for an individual’s effort.
  • It is also surprising that students’ individual efforts still increased when the reward depended on other students’ performances.

What does this mean?

How racialized women can tackle backlash when advocating for change

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

In the United States, congresswomen like Cori Bush, Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have faced severe backlash for their outspoken stances on racial justice, police reform and foreign policy.

Key Points: 
  • In the United States, congresswomen like Cori Bush, Ilhan Omar and Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez have faced severe backlash for their outspoken stances on racial justice, police reform and foreign policy.
  • Similarly, in Canada, Ontario MLA Sarah Jama also faced backlash for her stance in support of Palestine.
  • These examples are not isolated, and they highlight the persistent challenges faced by racialized women when they speak out.

Advocacy: A double-edged sword

  • On one side, it challenges capitalist-colonial relations foundational to many institutions, and promotes equitable access to employment, education and health care.
  • Many advocating for change must often do so within systems and institutions prioritizing profit or power over equality.
  • This backlash creates a ripple effect, deterring others from speaking out and perpetuating a cycle of silence, gaslighting and compliance.
  • Labels like these are often used to undermine racialized people by perpetuating harmful biases and reinforcing societal power imbalances.

The double bind: gender and race

  • This refers to the interlocking systems of oppression structured around race, class, gender, sexuality and nationality; these categories do not operate independently but are interconnected and reinforce one another.
  • They are often subjected to discrimination because of their race as well as their gender.
  • The compounded effects of racial and gender biases intensify these challenges, forcing them to navigate a more difficult landscape.

Personal and professional costs

  • Employers may view activism as a liability, leading to professional stagnation or regression.
  • For instance, Professor Anita Hill faced professional and personal attacks after her testimony against Clarence Thomas during his Supreme Court confirmation hearings.
  • Reduced income and limited career advancement opportunities have long-term financial implications, making it difficult to sustain advocacy work.

Strategies for support

NACEPF and Mobile Beacon Support FCC's Vote on Funding Hotspot Devices through E-Rate

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

The North American Catholic Education Programming Foundation Inc. (NACEPF) and Mobile Beacon, applaud the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) vote to make E-Rate funding eligible for school and library hotspot lending programs.

Key Points: 
  • The North American Catholic Education Programming Foundation Inc. (NACEPF) and Mobile Beacon, applaud the Federal Communications Commission’s (FCC) vote to make E-Rate funding eligible for school and library hotspot lending programs.
  • Mobile Beacon, a subsidiary of NACEPF, provides affordable internet access to the anchors of communities: nonprofits, schools, libraries, and healthcare organizations.
  • Mobile Beacon spearheaded the hotspot lending model with the Providence Community Library in 2012.
  • By allowing E-Rate funding to support hotspot lending programs, millions of students will have more equitable access to the internet to support their learning and development.”

NACEPF and Mobile Beacon Support FCC's Vote on Funding Hotspot Devices through E-Rate

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 18, 2024

Johnston, RI, July 18, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The North American Catholic Education Programming Foundation Inc. (NACEPF) and Mobile Beacon, applaud the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)’s vote to make E-Rate funding eligible for school and library hotspot lending programs.

Key Points: 
  • Johnston, RI, July 18, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The North American Catholic Education Programming Foundation Inc. (NACEPF) and Mobile Beacon, applaud the Federal Communications Commission (FCC)’s vote to make E-Rate funding eligible for school and library hotspot lending programs.
  • Mobile Beacon, a subsidiary of NACEPF, provides affordable internet access to the anchors of communities: nonprofits, schools, libraries, and healthcare organizations.
  • Mobile Beacon spearheaded the hotspot lending model with the Providence Community Library in 2012.
  • By allowing E-Rate funding to support hotspot lending programs, millions of students will have more equitable access to the internet to support their learning and development.”