Transparency International

Amsterdam & Partners LLP: First Hearing in George Bachiashvili Case Attracts International Scrutiny of the Republic of Georgia

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, March 27, 2024

TBILISI, Georgia, March 27, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- On Wednesday, March 27th at 1PM local time, the Tbilisi City Court will be holding the first procedural hearing in the criminal case, registration number 330100124008928623, brought by the former Prime Minister Bidzina Ivanishvili against the entrepreneur George Bachiashvili.

Key Points: 
  • Amsterdam & Partners LLP, the international law firm representing Bachiashvili, says that Georgia's prosecution service is put on notice that these hearings will face intense international scrutiny.
  • "The Bachiashvili case represents a travesty of due process and prosecutorial misconduct.
  • George Bachiashvili is one of Georgia's most successful young venture capitalists and the founder of the investment firm Mission Gate.
  • Amsterdam & Partners LLP is an international law firm with offices in London and Washington DC.

National Anti-Corruption Commission Thailand Exposes More Than 1,500 Instances of Corruption Through Proactive Investigations

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2024

The Center is instrumental in monitoring, evaluating, and investigating corruption cases, in line with the policy to actively prevent and suppress corruption.

Key Points: 
  • The Center is instrumental in monitoring, evaluating, and investigating corruption cases, in line with the policy to actively prevent and suppress corruption.
  • Over the past two years, the CDC's effective preventative measures have significantly reduced the number of corruption cases within the suppression system.
  • With an unwavering commitment to zero tolerance for corruption, Thailand can achieve its goal of a corruption-free society.
  • The National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) is a constitutional independent organization and supervised by nine commissioners selected from various professions.

The National Anti-Corruption Commission Thailand Alerts Investors to Risks of Gratuity Offerings as Potential Bribery

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, March 13, 2024

The NACC's Secretary-General, Mr. Niwatchai Kasemmongkol, emphasized that the regulatory framework established in 2020 includes criminal penalties for such offenses.

Key Points: 
  • The NACC's Secretary-General, Mr. Niwatchai Kasemmongkol, emphasized that the regulatory framework established in 2020 includes criminal penalties for such offenses.
  • The code aims to prevent the masking of bribes as gratuities, a practice that is identified as a seedbed for bribery and corruption, posing significant hurdles to national development and contravening legal standards.
  • This warning aligns with the stance of Transparency International (TI), which categorizes bribery as a form of corruption that must be eradicated.
  • The National Anti-Corruption Commission (NACC) is a constitutional independent organization supervised by nine commissioners selected from various professions.

A slide in global corruption rankings is bad for ‘Brand NZ’ – what can the government do?

Retrieved on: 
Monday, February 12, 2024

But she was also talking about the country’s international reputation for being clean, green, safe and honest.

Key Points: 
  • But she was also talking about the country’s international reputation for being clean, green, safe and honest.
  • But recent rankings measuring the country’s international influence, transparency and corruption have started to tell a different story.
  • Between 2021 and 2023, New Zealand dropped ten places – from 16 to 26 – on the Global Soft Power Index.

Brand New Zealand

  • According to the 2023 Anholt-Ipsos Nation Brand Index, New Zealand is the 14th most valuable country brand in the world, valued at close to half a trillion New Zealand dollars in 2022 by brand valuation and strategy company Brand Finance.
  • Brand New Zealand is a precious commodity in its own right, which has taken many decades to build.
  • Since 2014, New Zealand has dropped six points in its CPI score, three times more than Denmark or Finland.

Perceptions matter

  • A higher CPI score implies a lower level of perceived corruption.
  • Read more:
    Return of the ‘consultocracy’ – how cutting public service jobs to save costs usually backfires

    But its two-point CPI slide from 87 to 85 is driven by perceptions among business leaders, as captured by the most recent World Economic Forum’s executive opinion survey taken in August 2023.

  • CEO of Transparency International New Zealand, Julie Haggie, attributes the 2023 drop in business leaders’ confidence to three specific factors:


several high-profile cases of COVID-19 subsidy fraud and tax evasion by businesses
the government’s insufficient response to a rise in scamming, as well as a lack of transparency around government spending on outside consultation contracts and infrastructure projects
and a heightened focus on appropriate spending of public funds during a cost-of-living crisis when most New Zealanders are doing it tough.

Trust in government

  • But it must still be mindful of the fragility of general trust in public institutions and the government.
  • Damaging that trust can have unintended consequences for our international reputation.
  • Cutting public spending by between 6.5% and 7.5%, as government agencies have been told to do, may be viewed positively by business leaders.
  • But it can also erode public trust in government.

Turning the trend around

  • While it placed 14th in the latest Transparency International ranking (with a CPI score of 75), Australia has gained two points under the Albanese Labor government.
  • State capture by vested interest groups is a form of public corruption and would likely significantly affect New Zealand’s declining CPI score.


Matevz (Matt) Raskovic does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Australia’s ranking in global anti-corruption index remains steady – but shows we cannot be complacent

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, January 30, 2024

The latest Corruption Perceptions Index – an annual survey from Transparency International that tracks how corrupt governments are perceived to be – shows Australia still has a way to go on this front.

Key Points: 
  • The latest Corruption Perceptions Index – an annual survey from Transparency International that tracks how corrupt governments are perceived to be – shows Australia still has a way to go on this front.
  • Australia came in at 14th place with a score of 75 out of 100, which is the same score as last year.
  • In 2012, Australia had ranked an impressive seventh in the world with a score of 85.

The anti-corruption commission is just the first step

  • Using rigorous methodology, the index compiles independent assessments of a country’s efforts to prevent and control corruption by business leaders and experts.
  • The National Anti-Corruption Commission, for example, is not the magic bullet that alone will restore Australia’s good standing on the global stage.
  • While it’s important to investigate these allegations of wrongdoing, the National Anti-Corruption Commission cannot stop every bad policy or practice.
  • Promoting integrity is bigger than the National Anti-Corruption Commission.

Election financing and whisteblower reforms

  • While the National Anti-Corruption Commission is a first step, we still need to implement reforms on election financing, foreign bribery and anti-money laundering regulations, and protections for whistleblowers.
  • However, there is more the commission should be able to do if the government makes the appropriate policy decisions on election reform.
  • Three areas need attention: 1) We need limits on campaign financing and better regulation of political donations.


Adam Graycar has received funding from the Australian Research Council. He is a member of Transparency International.

Media Advisory: Gary White and Matt Damon to join CEOs and global leaders at UN Global Compact Leaders Summit 2023

Retrieved on: 
Monday, September 11, 2023

Gary White, CEO and Co-founder of water.org and WaterEquity and Matt Damon, Co-founder of water.org, will join Executive Director and CEO of the UN Global Compact, Sanda Ojiambo, CEOs of major corporations and other leaders from the United Nations, governments, civil society and UN Global Compact Local Networks to take stock of business progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit 2023.

Key Points: 
  • Gary White, CEO and Co-founder of water.org and WaterEquity and Matt Damon, Co-founder of water.org, will join Executive Director and CEO of the UN Global Compact, Sanda Ojiambo, CEOs of major corporations and other leaders from the United Nations, governments, civil society and UN Global Compact Local Networks to take stock of business progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) at the UN Global Compact Leaders Summit 2023.
  • The converging crises of climate change, a deadly global pandemic, worsening social and economic inequality, unchecked corruption and the devastating consequences of the war in Ukraine have caused unprecedented disruption and global transformation.
  • Alongside the UN General Assembly High-Level Week, this year’s UN Global Compact Leaders Summit will address business leadership during converging crises, the critical role of a principles-based approach, global trends, and tools and partnerships needed to fully achieve the 2030 Agenda.
  • The UN Global Compact will also reveal its twelve new SDG Pioneers — business leaders who are doing an exceptional job to advance the SDGs through the implementation of the Ten Principles of UN Global Compact on human rights, environment, labour and anti-corruption.

Zimbabwe heads to the polls amid high inflation, a slumping currency and a cost of living crisis

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, August 10, 2023

Persistently high inflation, elevated interest rates, and a slumping and volatile Zimbabwe dollar have combined to fuel a cost of living crisis for households and battered business activity.

Key Points: 
  • Persistently high inflation, elevated interest rates, and a slumping and volatile Zimbabwe dollar have combined to fuel a cost of living crisis for households and battered business activity.
  • These will be among the key economic concerns weighing on Zimbabweans as they prepare to cast their votes at elections scheduled for late August.
  • President Emmerson Mnangagwa is campaigning to secure a second mandate that will extend his five-year term in power.
  • Additionally, the high pace of price growth has outpaced nominal wage growth, leaving many people struggling to afford everyday essentials.

Governance vulnerabilities

    • Governance broadly refers to institutions used to exercise authority by the government.
    • Long-running weaknesses in fiscal and central bank governance institutions have undermined the capacity of the government to effectively formulate and implement sound fiscal and monetary policies for many years.
    • This was done without fixing vulnerabilities in fiscal and monetary governance that had eventually led to the demise of the Zimbabwe dollar in 2009.
    • Because of these vulnerabilities, inflation skyrocketed to 255% in 2019 – a 23-fold increase from a year earlier as money supply growth quickened from 28% to 250% amid a widening government budget deficit which topped 10% of GDP in 2017.
    • The US dollar is also seen as a haven which has taken on greater importance as inflation remains stubbornly high.

Weaknesses in governance breed corruption

    • Weaknesses in governance also create opportunities for higher levels of government corruption, which can lead to public spending waste, inefficiencies and lower revenue collection.
    • In 2022, Transparency International ranked Zimbabwe 157 out of 180 countries based on perceived levels of public sector corruption, where the lower the rank the higher the perceived corruption.

A path forward


    Zimbabwe’s economy is facing a confluence of challenges: inflation that won’t go away, higher interest rates and a sliding currency. The fallout has included a cost of living crisis, slowing business activity and fewer jobs. These problems are symptoms of deeply embedded structural weaknesses in the economy. The following reforms are crucial for addressing these structural weaknesses:
    In addition, good fiscal governance positively affects central bank governance by reducing the need for central bank financing, which allows a reduction in inflation.

Event: Compliance for Financial Institutions

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, July 6, 2023

PARIS, July 06, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The CBF (Banking and Financial Council) organized an awareness day aimed at banking and financial institutions under the theme "Preventing non-compliance risks for financial institutions: from constraint to opportunity".

Key Points: 
  • PARIS, July 06, 2023 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- The CBF (Banking and Financial Council) organized an awareness day aimed at banking and financial institutions under the theme "Preventing non-compliance risks for financial institutions: from constraint to opportunity".
  • The current context, characterized by a transformation of international management systems and a constant evolution of globalization phenomena, exponentially exposes financial institutions to risks and urges them to organize accordingly.
  • In recent months, the Russo-Ukrainian conflict has demonstrated the importance of the economic sanctions prevention framework within financial institutions.
  • "A number of correspondent banks increasingly practice de-risking on financial institutions, particularly those located in Africa."

Four priorities for Nigeria’s newly elected national assembly

Retrieved on: 
Monday, July 3, 2023

The 109 senators and 360 representatives were elected on 25 February 2023.

Key Points: 
  • The 109 senators and 360 representatives were elected on 25 February 2023.
  • Godswill Akpabio was elected Senate president and Tajudeen Abass House of Representatives speaker.
  • In Nigeria, the power of the National Assembly’s two houses to legislate is enshrined in section 4 of the 1999 constitution.

Issues deserving attention

    • I think the National Assembly should focus on the following issues for the next four years: the economy; power supply; infrastructure; and security.
    • The recent removal of the fuel subsidy will make it harder for people to make a living and survive.
    • Thus, a legislative agenda to redeem the national economy is imperative..

      Read more:
      Nigeria's economy: four priorities president-elect Bola Tinubu must deliver on

      .

    • Power supply Second, meaningful economic policies and programmes require a regular power supply.
    • Since 1999, an estimated N11 trillion (about US$14 billion) has reportedly been committed by successive governments to electricity supply.
    • On top of this, a 40% electricity tariff hike is due to take off on 1 July.

The way forward

    • Since the Fourth Republic began on 29 May 1999, Nigerians have been waiting in vain for the assembly to fulfil this role.
    • Under President Olusegun Obasanjo’s government from 1999 to 2007, the National Assembly was unable to assert its relevance.
    • When other institutions of the government fail in their responsibilities, the legislature cannot afford to fail its principal, the people.

Global Leaders and Civic Courage Stand Up for Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Muhammad Yunus

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, March 7, 2023

Muhammad Yunus, one of seven people in history to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal, and the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, has been under attack by Sheikh Hasina and her government off and on since 2010.

Key Points: 
  • Muhammad Yunus, one of seven people in history to receive the Nobel Peace Prize, the U.S. Congressional Gold Medal, and the U.S. Presidential Medal of Freedom, has been under attack by Sheikh Hasina and her government off and on since 2010.
  • "The attacks on Muhammad Yunus are exactly what you'd expect from an authoritarian government," said Sam Daley-Harris, founder of Civic Courage and the anti-poverty lobby RESULTS which began working closely with Muhammad Yunus in 1987.
  • Professor Yunus shared the Nobel Peace Prize with Grameen Bank in 2006.
  • The letter acknowledges Muhammad Yunus' contributions to Bangladesh and to the world and calls on the Prime Minister to suspend her harassment and persecution of him.