Water resources

Two Anglo American mines are first South African operations audited against the IRMA Standard for Responsible Mining

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

SEATTLE, Feb. 16, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today the Initiative for Responsible Mining (IRMA) released the audits of Anglo American’s Amandelbult and Mototolo PGM operations against the IRMA Standard for Responsible Mining. Independent audit firm ERM-CVS assessed Amandelbult at IRMA 50 and Mototolo at IRMA 75 when measuring their performance against the Standard’s best practice social and environmental criteria.

Key Points: 
  • Amandelbult and Mototolo achieve IRMA 50 and IRMA 75, respectively
    SEATTLE, Feb. 16, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Today the Initiative for Responsible Mining (IRMA) released the audits of Anglo American’s Amandelbult and Mototolo PGM operations against the IRMA Standard for Responsible Mining.
  • IRMA also released the surveillance (interim) audit for Anglo’s Unki PGM operation in Zimbabwe, as conducted by audit firm SCS Global.
  • The full audit reports are available on the Amandelbult and Mototolo audit pages, as well as Unki’s surveillance report, on the IRMA website .
  • “This report demonstrates that mines can point to transparent, independent evaluations of their environmental and social performance,” said Aimee Boulanger, Executive Director of IRMA.

Rhinos can’t sweat, making them vulnerable to overheating: global warming could wipe them out in southern Africa

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Southern Africa is home to 22,137 of the world’s 23,432 white and black African rhinos.

Key Points: 
  • Southern Africa is home to 22,137 of the world’s 23,432 white and black African rhinos.
  • But they’re facing grave threats because of a warming planet.

Why are rhinos in danger of being wiped out?


Rhinos cannot sweat. If they want to cool their large bodies down in the heat, they need to consume a lot of water. They also rely on wallowing in water holes and resting in the shade. As Earth heats up, rhinos will only survive if they have more opportunities to cool down.

How did you calculate that rhinos will not survive the worst scenario?

  • We looked at the temperature and rainfall averages in each of the best locations for rhinos, and then we mapped out the extremes.
  • Our conclusion was that if the world enters the 8.5 Representative Concentration Pathway, there is zero probability of rhinos surviving in southern Africa.

Is there a Plan B to avoid the worst for rhinos?

  • Our view is that governments and societies should start planning immediately to ward off the worst-case scenario.
  • For rhinos to survive this climate change scenario, corridors will also need to be set up for rhinos to move between parks.
  • This will be very challenging for the parks and they must start planning their landscapes now.

How much will all this cost?

  • One of the ideas is that when you protect a species like rhinos, elephants and gorillas, the investment you make in that species will help multiple species.
  • Until recently, our mindset about rhinos was about how they benefit us by bringing in revenues.
  • We have to start looking at rhinos as an essential part of an ecosystem that is providing services to society.

2085 isn’t far away. Could it really be over for rhinos by then?

  • These pathways are the global standard for predicting how the climate will change based on the actions of humans.
  • We chose to map the future of rhinos based on the 4.5 and 8.5 Representative Concentration Pathways.
  • This will warm the climate on the planet by an average of 2.4°C (between 1.7 and 3.2 degrees celsius) by 2100.
  • But Earth will only get onto this pathway if we manage to cut methane gas and carbon dioxide emissions.
  • By 2100, carbon dioxide emissions would also need to drop by half the level reached in 2050.


Timothy Randhir does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

LiqTech Enters Distribution Agreement with Razorback Direct for Commercialization of LiqTech Produced Water Treatment Solution in the U.S.

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, February 14, 2024

Leveraging LiqTech's proven ceramic silicon carbide filtration technologies, the Company's produced water treatment solution focuses on tertiary water treatment to facilitate re-injection and reuse and to meet current and future regulatory requirements.

Key Points: 
  • Leveraging LiqTech's proven ceramic silicon carbide filtration technologies, the Company's produced water treatment solution focuses on tertiary water treatment to facilitate re-injection and reuse and to meet current and future regulatory requirements.
  • Razorback Direct invests most of its Research and Development focus on the beneficial reuse and recycling of produced water.
  • This agreement with LiqTech greatly enhances the overall Razorback Direct produced water treatment offering by bringing highly complementary ceramic ultrafiltration technology.
  • Fei Chen, President and CEO of LiqTech International, commented, "The agreement with Razorback Direct is a critical development to expand our presence in North America by showcasing the benefits of our produced water treatment solution to the oil and gas industry.

Great Lakes Reports Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2023 Results

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, February 14, 2024

HOUSTON, Feb. 14, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Corporation (“Great Lakes” or the “Company”) (Nasdaq: GLDD), the largest provider of dredging services in the United States, today reported financial results for the quarter and year ended December 31, 2023.

Key Points: 
  • Lasse Petterson, President and Chief Executive Officer commented, “We ended the year strong with solid fourth quarter results.
  • Gross margin percentage increased to 21.3% in the fourth quarter of 2023 from -11.0% in the fourth quarter of 2022 partially due to improved project performance.
  • Great Lakes cautions investors that any forward-looking statements made by Great Lakes are not guarantees or indicative of future performance.
  • Great Lakes' future financial condition and results of operations, as well as any forward-looking statements, are subject to change and inherent risks and uncertainties.

17 million South Africans live on communal land – new study of a rural valley offers insights on how to manage it

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2024

The valley is typical of South Africa’s communal land: affected by soil erosion, bush encroachment and water scarcity.

Key Points: 
  • The valley is typical of South Africa’s communal land: affected by soil erosion, bush encroachment and water scarcity.
  • About one third (over 17 million) of South Africa’s population lives on communal land, which makes up around 13% of all land in the country.
  • The Communal Land Tenure Bill, 2017 defines communal land as “owned, occupied or used by members of a community subject to shared rules or norms and customs”.
  • In South Africa, communal land is considered to be more degraded than privately owned land.
  • This offered a more complete view of communal land change, and valuable insights on its impacts.

Satellite imagery and community perceptions

  • Our study set out to discover whether satellite-measured trends of land use and land cover corresponded with those perceived by the community.
  • Satellite imagery from 1989 to 2019 revealed increases of the sweet thorn tree (Vachellia karroo) by 25% and the residential area (2.5%).
  • Most respondents (over 80%) noted the encroachment of the sweet thorn tree on grazing land and abandoned cropland.
  • The community perceived that water resources had declined because of overuse and poor maintenance of dams.
  • They said the government no longer desilted community dams, and that the community had abandoned traditional practices such as the maintenance of surface water channels and homestead ponds.

Better land management

  • The land can be better managed through interventions by village committees, tribal authorities and extension services, and by following spatial planning and land use guidelines.
  • This study shows that the combination of satellite imagery and local perceptions provides valuable insights about the extent, causes and impacts of land change in communal areas.


Wonga Masiza receives funding from Agricultural Research Council.

Woodbridge International Announces Sale of Black Eagle Consulting, Inc. to RMA Companies

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2024

NEW HAVEN, Conn., Feb. 13, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Woodbridge International, a global mergers and acquisitions firm, is pleased to announce the acquisition of its client, Black Eagle Consulting, Inc. by RMA Companies.

Key Points: 
  • NEW HAVEN, Conn., Feb. 13, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Woodbridge International, a global mergers and acquisitions firm, is pleased to announce the acquisition of its client, Black Eagle Consulting, Inc. by RMA Companies.
  • Black Eagle Consulting, Inc. established more than two decades ago in Nevada, is a leading provider of geotechnical engineering, construction inspection and testing, materials testing, and advanced non-destructive examination services.
  • Black Eagle supports a wide variety of transportation, power plants, utilities, municipal, federal, industrial, commercial, and residential projects.
  • Woodbridge International’s ground-breaking approach to marketing a company globally has transformed the way the sell-side M&A industry does business.

Barnwell Industries, Inc. Reports First Quarter Results

Retrieved on: 
Monday, February 12, 2024

HONOLULU, Feb. 12, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Barnwell Industries, Inc. (NYSE American: BRN) today reported financial results for the first quarter ended December 31, 2023. The Company posted quarterly revenue of $6,155,000 and a net loss of $664,000, or $0.07 per share. In the three months ended December 31, 2022, the Company had quarterly revenue of $7,511,000 and net earnings of $1,089,000, or $0.11 per share.

Key Points: 
  • HONOLULU, Feb. 12, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Barnwell Industries, Inc. (NYSE American: BRN) today reported financial results for the first quarter ended December 31, 2023.
  • Additionally, in last year’s first quarter, our contract drilling segment recognized a $551,000 gain on the sale of one drilling rig, whereas there was no such gain this quarter.
  • “We are pleased to report that our oil, natural gas, and natural gas liquids production increased from the prior year’s quarter by 21%, 26% and 80%, respectively.
  • Forward-looking statements involve risks, uncertainties and assumptions which could cause actual results to differ materially from those contained in such statements.

Press release - Human rights breaches in Belarus, Iran and Nigeria

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 9, 2024

On Thursday, the European Parliament adopted three resolutions on human rights issues in Belarus, Iran and Nigeria.Subcommittee on Human Rights Source : © European Union, 2024 - EP

Key Points: 


On Thursday, the European Parliament adopted three resolutions on human rights issues in Belarus, Iran and Nigeria.Subcommittee on Human Rights Source : © European Union, 2024 - EP

Five Burns & Levinson Partners Named to 2024 Lawdragon Green 500: Leaders in Environmental Law

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 8, 2024

BOSTON and PROVIDENCE, R.I., Feb. 8, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Burns & Levinson partners Sean Coffey , Peter Durning , Thomas Mackie , David Rosenblatt , and John Shea have been selected for inclusion in the 2024 Lawdragon Green 500: Leaders in Environmental Law for their remarkable achievements in environmental law.

Key Points: 
  • BOSTON and PROVIDENCE, R.I., Feb. 8, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Burns & Levinson partners Sean Coffey , Peter Durning , Thomas Mackie , David Rosenblatt , and John Shea have been selected for inclusion in the 2024 Lawdragon Green 500: Leaders in Environmental Law for their remarkable achievements in environmental law.
  • He represents public companies, real estate developers, investors, small businesses, and municipalities in environmental litigation, enforcement defense, land use, and permitting.
  • He is the author of "Hazardous Waste Cleanup Law" in the Massachusetts Environmental Law treatise published by MCLE.
  • from the University of Maine Law School, his master's degree in environmental law, cum laude, from Vermont Law School, and his B.S., cum laude, from Holy Cross College.

Ghana: Kumasi city’s unplanned boom is destroying two rivers – sewage, heavy metals and chemical pollution detected

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, February 7, 2024

Kumasi, Ghana’s second largest city, has a high level of encroachment and this has led to the pollution of water bodies.

Key Points: 
  • Kumasi, Ghana’s second largest city, has a high level of encroachment and this has led to the pollution of water bodies.
  • As scholars of urban planning and chemistry, we conducted a study in the greater Kumasi metropolis to understand the extent of encroachment and pollution of two rivers, Subin and Wiwi.
  • We also wanted to know more about the extent of water pollution, land-use dynamics and water resources regulations, and how they influence the quality of water resources.
  • We recommend that the city authorities monitor what is happening better and do more to prevent degradation of Kumasi’s water bodies.

Effects of land use on the quality of water bodies

  • Also, the intense pressure of urbanisation on the available land has resulted in a high level of encroachment in wetlands.
  • As a result of limited investment in sewage plants, most of the city’s untreated waste water is discharged into the surface water bodies.
  • This has implications for the quality and sustainability of these water bodies.
  • During heavy rains, the refuse runs off into the water, affecting water quality and flow.
  • The industrial activities along the water bodies include washing bays, auto-mechanical activities, welding and wood processing.

Time for Kumasi to wake up

  • Urban growth can coexist with natural resources if human activities located near water bodies don’t threaten their quality and continued existence.
  • Our study shows that Kumasi has developed with little regard for its natural assets.
  • City authorities ought to put in place measures to clean the water bodies and convert buffer areas into parks and green spaces.
  • Ecologically sensitive areas that are 100 feet away from wetlands should be compulsorily acquired as natural assets for the public interest.


The authors do not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and have disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.