Climate

LoanPro awarded Utah's "Fintech of the Year" award for innovation and leadership

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

SALT LAKE CITY, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- LoanPro, the market-leading API-first lending and credit platform, was awarded the 2023 Fintech of the Year award by the State of Utah Governor's Fintech Advisory Council.

Key Points: 
  • The Utah Governor's Fintech Advisory Council awarded LoanPro the "Fintech of the Year" award.
  • The award recognizes both the company's modern credit platform and how they have enabled innovation in the fintech sphere.
  • SALT LAKE CITY, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- LoanPro , the market-leading API-first lending and credit platform, was awarded the 2023 Fintech of the Year award by the State of Utah Governor's Fintech Advisory Council.
  • This year, they awarded LoanPro their Fintech of the Year award.

UniCredit and Rockefeller Asset Management Launch onemarkets Rockefeller Global Innovation Equity Fund Focused on Identifying Companies Driving Innovation

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

Rockefeller Asset Management (Rockefeller), the asset management arm of Rockefeller Capital Management, and UniCredit, a pan-European commercial bank with a unique service offering in Italy, Germany, Central and Eastern Europe, have partnered to launch the onemarkets Rockefeller Global Innovation Equity Fund.

Key Points: 
  • Rockefeller Asset Management (Rockefeller), the asset management arm of Rockefeller Capital Management, and UniCredit, a pan-European commercial bank with a unique service offering in Italy, Germany, Central and Eastern Europe, have partnered to launch the onemarkets Rockefeller Global Innovation Equity Fund.
  • The launch represents the first time Rockefeller has partnered with an Italian institution around the distribution of such a fund.
  • "We believe this fund is a compelling opportunity for European investors seeking to capitalize on innovation and is a truly differentiated global equity offering in the European market.”
    “At its core, our onemarkets Fund family is all about delivering bespoke, best-in-class asset management strategies to clients across our Group.
  • Our partnership with Rockefeller Asset Management goes exactly in this direction – and we’re pleased to bring their skills and expertise on board via the onemarkets Rockefeller Global Innovation Fund, which will give investors exclusive exposure to the very best in innovation,” concluded Claudia Vacanti, Head of Group Investment & Protection Products, UniCredit.

Ross Garnaut and Rod Sims have proposed a $100 billion-a-year fossil fuel tax – and it’s a debate Australia should embrace

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

Leading Australian economists Ross Garnaut and Rod Sims this week sought to shake up the carbon policy debate in Australia, by proposing a tax on the nation’s fossil fuel production.

Key Points: 
  • Leading Australian economists Ross Garnaut and Rod Sims this week sought to shake up the carbon policy debate in Australia, by proposing a tax on the nation’s fossil fuel production.
  • They claim it could raise A$100 billion in its first year and position Australia at the forefront of the low-carbon revolution.
  • The proposal has been rejected by the federal government and the Nationals, as well as business groups and the fossil fuel industry.

How would the tax work?

  • It involves a “carbon solutions levy” applied to all fossil fuel extraction sites in Australia (around 105 sites), and on all fossil fuel imports to Australia.
  • The tax would presumably be calculated according to the emissions generated when the fuels are burned.
  • Garnaut and Sims say proceeds in the first year of the levy would be well over A$100 billion.
  • And as Garnaut also outlined in his speech, climate change threatens Australia’s economy, which remains heavily dependent on exporting fossil fuels.

Is the levy a good idea?

  • The purpose of a carbon tax, or levy, is to ensure polluting companies pay for the damage they cause.
  • In theory, the taxes make polluting production processes more expensive than the alternatives, reducing demand for those products.
  • The world, including Australia, has committed to reaching net-zero emissions by 2050.
  • After more than a decade of the so-called “climate wars” in Australia, the term “carbon tax” remains politically unpalatable.

The rest of the world got the memo

  • Notably, from 2026 a European Union tariff on carbon-intensive imports will come into effect.
  • The policy is designed to level the playing field for EU manufacturers that must pay a penalty for their own pollution.
  • In coming years, we can expect other jurisdictions to implement similar policies to guard their domestic industries.
  • And finally, imposing a carbon levy in Australia would ensure we get to keep the revenue for ourselves.

Will such a levy ever happen?

  • But as the world comes to terms with the economic reality of climate change, Australia risks being left behind.
  • As Garnaut told the ABC, everyone is a winner under the plan, except fossil fuel companies which, he conceded, “will hate it”.
  • But climate change is wreaking havoc on human communities, on natural systems, and on the global economy.
  • A carbon levy of the type proposed is an eminently sensible approach to get to net zero.


Ian A. MacKenzie does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

20°C seems the optimal temperature for life on Earth to thrive – what does this mean in a warming world?

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

We know many species can live at much colder or warmer temperatures than humans.

Key Points: 
  • We know many species can live at much colder or warmer temperatures than humans.
  • This means biological processes increase in line with temperature, reach a maximum, and then rapidly decline when it gets too hot.
  • When the number of species was plotted against the average annual temperature, there was a decline above 20°C.
  • Read more:
    Remote Pacific coral reef shows at least some ability to cope with ocean warming – new study

Biological processes and biodiversity

  • Research in Tasmania modelled the growth rates of microbes and multi-cellular organisms and found the most stable temperature for their biological processes was also 20°C.
  • This “Corkrey model” built on other studies showing 20°C was the most stable temperature for biological molecules.


marine and freshwater species’ tolerance of low oxygen
marine pelagic (open water living) and benthic (seabed living) algal productivity and fish predation rates on bait
global species richness in pelagic fishes, plankton, benthic invertebrates and fossil molluscs
and genetic diversity.
There were also increased extinctions in the fossil record when temperatures exceeded 20°C.

Increased species richness

  • While many species have evolved to live at warmer and colder temperatures, most species live at 20°C.
  • As species evolve to live at temperatures above and below 20°C, their thermal niche gets wider.
  • In turn, this should maximise species richness across all domains of life, from bacteria to the multi-cellular plants and animals.

Predicting the effects of climate change

  • This means the many marine species that can adapt to global warming by shifting their geographic distribution are unlikely to go extinct due to climate change.
  • Despite the complexity of multi-cellular species, it is remarkable that the cellular-level temperature efficiencies are reflected in those other aspects of biodiversity.
  • Exactly why 20°C is pivotal and energy-efficient for cellular processes may be due to the molecular properties of water associated with cells.


Mark John Costello received funding from the Royal Society of New Zealand-Te Apārangi that contributed to this research.. Ross Corkrey does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

8 ways that stopping overfishing will promote biodiversity and help address climate change

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Halting overfishing is itself effective climate action.

Key Points: 
  • Halting overfishing is itself effective climate action.
  • The intricate relationship between climate change and ocean ecosystems was the subject of recent collaborative research — led by researchers at the University of British Columbia — that highlighted the crucial links between overfishing and climate change.

Finding the connections

  • Doing so would bolster marine life resilience in the face of climate shifts and reduce associate carbon emissions.
  • 2 — Large subsidized fishing boat fleets can actually be a burden on small-scale fisheries, leaving them disproportionately vulnerable to shocks.
  • In turn, overfishing not only depletes resources but also escalates carbon emissions, intensifying climate impacts on these fisheries and their communities, particularly women.
  • Read more:
    Flipping Indigenous regional development in Newfoundland upside-down: lessons from Australia

    6 — Overfishing exacerbates climate and biodiversity threats.

  • 7 — International fisheries management must play a central role in promoting biodiversity and retaining the ocean’s carbon sequestration potential.
  • While 87 nations have signed the UN’s Biodiversity of Areas Beyond National Jurisdiction Treaty (also known as the High Seas Treaty), only one has ratified it.
  • Future regulations should allocate a percentage of the annual fish quota to maintain the carbon sequestration function of marine animals.

A simple goal

  • Ending overfishing isn’t just an ecological imperative but a linchpin for climate action.
  • Furthermore, fisheries aren’t mere victims in these dynamics, but have real agency to play a pivotal role in either exacerbating or mitigating climate change.
  • Regulation of fisheries, while controversial, is essential to not overly exploit such a valuable public resource.


Rashid Sumaila receives funding from Canadian Research Councils, the Belmont, intergovernmental organizations, e.g. the World Bank, foundations and philanthropies (e.g. Pew, Oceana and the Dona Bertarelli).

Government of Canada and FCM Fund Municipal Climate Action Across British Columbia

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Federal and municipal partnerships are critical to building climate resilient communities with energy efficient buildings and accessible public transit.

Key Points: 
  • Federal and municipal partnerships are critical to building climate resilient communities with energy efficient buildings and accessible public transit.
  • The Green Municipal Fund (GMF), administered by the FCM, is funded through a $1.65 billion federal endowment by the Government of Canada.
  • "The Government of Canada is investing in municipal climate solutions in communities here in British Columbia and across the country.
  • "I am pleased to announce nearly $1 million of federal support to unlock climate action in communities across British Columbia.

Climate change is forcing Australians to weigh up relocating. How do they make that difficult decision?

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Big environmental changes mean ever more Australians will confront the tough choice of whether to move home or risk staying put.

Key Points: 
  • Big environmental changes mean ever more Australians will confront the tough choice of whether to move home or risk staying put.
  • Communities in the tropical north are losing residents as these regions become hotter and more humid.
  • Others face rising bushfire risks that force them to weigh up the difficult decision to move home.

We’ve been slow to adapt to increasing impacts

  • It is increasing the frequency and intensity of disasters and extreme weather events such as heatwaves, fires, storms and floods.
  • It is also accelerating environmental changes such as soil erosion, salinisation of waterways, loss of biodiversity, and land and water degradation.
  • Both sudden disruptions and gradual pervasive decline have impacts on the places where we live, work and play.

What factors affect the decision to stay or go?

  • Systemic inequalities mean some people are more at risk from environmental change and have less capacity to respond than others.
  • This makes it more likely to be owned or rented by people with fewer financial resources, compounding their disadvantage.
  • For First Nations peoples and communities, connections to and responsibilities for places (Country) are intimately intertwined with identity.
  • For them, the impacts of climate change, colonisation and resettlement interact, further complicating the question of relocation.

So who stays and who leaves?

  • They nominated bushland, beaches, fauna and flora, and the climate/weather as characteristics they valued and feared changing or losing as climate change progressed.
  • One study participant wrote:
    It would be hotter and much more unpleasant in summer.
  • I would miss being able to cycle or walk to the local lakes to connect to nature and feel peaceful.
  • We also found place attachment was associated with people acting to protect that place, such as protesting environmentally destructive policies.

Proper planning for adaptation is long overdue

  • It causes significant economic and non-economic losses for both individuals and communities.
  • A changing climate and inappropriately built or located housing interact to create conditions where some people can or should no longer stay.
  • We need co-ordinated, well-governed, long-term planning for people to move in the face of environmental change to ensure equitable and positive transitions for individuals and communities.


Justine Dandy received funding for this work from the Centre for People, Place and Planet, Edith Cowan University. Zoe Leviston received funding for this work from the College of Health and Medicine, Australian National University

Airgas Named to Newsweek’s America’s Greatest Workplaces 2023 and America's Greatest Workplaces for Diversity 2024 Lists

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Airgas, an Air Liquide company, has been featured on two of Newsweek’s prominent lists: America’s Greatest Workplaces for 2023 and America’s Greatest Workplaces for Diversity 2024.

Key Points: 
  • Airgas, an Air Liquide company, has been featured on two of Newsweek’s prominent lists: America’s Greatest Workplaces for 2023 and America’s Greatest Workplaces for Diversity 2024.
  • View the full release here: https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20240215454405/en/
    Airgas Named to America's Greatest Workplaces for Diversity 2024 List (Graphic: Business Wire)
    The America’s Greatest Workplaces for Diversity 2024 list, by Newsweek and Plant-A Insights Group, features the top large and mid-size companies recognized by their employees for respecting and valuing individuals from different walks of life.
  • Categories within the survey included the proactive management of diverse workforce, work-life balance, company image, working environment and compensation and benefits.
  • Airgas was also recently recognized as one of America’s Greatest Workplaces 2023.

Pyxus International Achieves CDP Climate Change Leadership Status

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

MORRISVILLE, N.C., Feb. 15, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Pyxus International, Inc. (OTC Pink: PYYX), a global value-added agricultural company, has been recognized as a leader in climate change transparency and performance by the environmental non-profit CDP. CDP ranked Pyxus among the top tier of responding companies in the climate change category, earning the business "Leadership" status, the highest level of achievement.

Key Points: 
  • – Climate change score higher than industry, North America and global averages –
    MORRISVILLE, N.C., Feb. 15, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Pyxus International, Inc. (OTC Pink: PYYX), a global value-added agricultural company, has been recognized as a leader in climate change transparency and performance by the environmental non-profit CDP.
  • CDP ranked Pyxus among the top tier of responding companies in the climate change category, earning the business "Leadership" status, the highest level of achievement.
  • "Achieving CDP's Leadership status is a testament to our global teams' hard work, ingenuity and commitment to growing a better world," said Pyxus President and CEO Pieter Sikkel.
  • Pyxus began reporting its greenhouse gas emissions to CDP in 2009, its water data in 2014 and its forestry data in 2020.