Gene

First Patient Randomized in AskBio Phase II Gene Therapy Trial for Congestive Heart Failure

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

Bayer AG and Asklepios BioPharmaceutical, Inc. (AskBio), a gene therapy company wholly owned and independently operated as a subsidiary of Bayer AG, today announced that the first patient has been randomized in GenePHIT (Gene PHosphatase Inhibition Therapy), a Phase II trial of AB-1002 (also known as NAN-101) for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF).

Key Points: 
  • Bayer AG and Asklepios BioPharmaceutical, Inc. (AskBio), a gene therapy company wholly owned and independently operated as a subsidiary of Bayer AG, today announced that the first patient has been randomized in GenePHIT (Gene PHosphatase Inhibition Therapy), a Phase II trial of AB-1002 (also known as NAN-101) for the treatment of congestive heart failure (CHF).
  • “GenePHIT will evaluate the safety and efficacy of AB-1002 in the largest number of patients to date and improve our understanding of gene therapy overall for the treatment of congestive heart failure.
  • “The enrollment of this first patient in the Phase II trial represents the culmination of many years of dedicated research and development in all aspects of cardiac gene therapy for congestive heart failure.
  • AB-1002 is manufactured by Viralgen Vector Core, S.L., a wholly owned and independently operated subsidiary of AskBio.

Kanazawa University research: Chromatin Accessibility: A new avenue for gene editing

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

KANAZAWA, Japan, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- In a study recently published in Nature Genetics, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University explore chromatin accessibility, i.e., endogenous access pathways to the genomic DNA, and its use as a tool for gene editing.

Key Points: 
  • KANAZAWA, Japan, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- In a study recently published in Nature Genetics, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University explore chromatin accessibility, i.e., endogenous access pathways to the genomic DNA, and its use as a tool for gene editing.
  • This phenomenon known as 'chromatin accessibility' involves a privileged set of protein molecules, many of which are still unknown.
  • Now, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University, led by Yusuke Miyanari, have used advanced genetic screening methods to unravel chromatin accessibility and its pathways.
  • In this study the genes identified by CRISPR screening were subjected to ATAC-see to confirm their involvement with chromatin accessibility.

Kanazawa University research: Chromatin Accessibility: A new avenue for gene editing

Retrieved on: 
Friday, February 16, 2024

KANAZAWA, Japan, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- In a study recently published in Nature Genetics, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University explore chromatin accessibility, i.e., endogenous access pathways to the genomic DNA, and its use as a tool for gene editing.

Key Points: 
  • KANAZAWA, Japan, Feb. 16, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- In a study recently published in Nature Genetics, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University explore chromatin accessibility, i.e., endogenous access pathways to the genomic DNA, and its use as a tool for gene editing.
  • This phenomenon known as 'chromatin accessibility' involves a privileged set of protein molecules, many of which are still unknown.
  • Now, researchers from Nano Life Science Institute (WPI-NanoLSI), Kanazawa University, led by Yusuke Miyanari, have used advanced genetic screening methods to unravel chromatin accessibility and its pathways.
  • In this study the genes identified by CRISPR screening were subjected to ATAC-see to confirm their involvement with chromatin accessibility.

2Blades Delivers on Project with Bayer Crop Science to Combat Asian Soybean Rust

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

Evanston, St. Louis, & Norwich, Feb. 15, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- 2Blades announces that it has successfully delivered on goals in a project launched in 2018 and extended in 2023 with Bayer Crop Science to identify resistance genes against Asian Soybean Rust (ASR).

Key Points: 
  • Evanston, St. Louis, & Norwich, Feb. 15, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- 2Blades announces that it has successfully delivered on goals in a project launched in 2018 and extended in 2023 with Bayer Crop Science to identify resistance genes against Asian Soybean Rust (ASR).
  • The project also involved partners at The Sainsbury Laboratory (Norwich, UK) and the Universidade Federal de Viçosa (Minas Gerais, Brazil).
  • "Asian soybean rust is one of the most significant threats to soybean production globally,” said Ty Vaughn, Head of Plant Biotechnology for Bayer Crop Science.
  • In search of more effective measures against ASR, 2Blades and Bayer Crop Science sought to identify novel sources of genetic resistance for sustainable and environmentally friendly protection from ASR.

Ozone and PM2.5 Exposure is Associated with Nasal Key Driver Gene Expression in People with Asthma

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

MILWAUKEE, Feb. 15, 2024 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- Nasal key driver gene expression representing T-cell mediated immune processes is associated with ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure in people with asthma according to new research being presented at the 2024 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.

Key Points: 
  • MILWAUKEE, Feb. 15, 2024 /PRNewswire-PRWeb/ -- Nasal key driver gene expression representing T-cell mediated immune processes is associated with ozone and fine particulate matter (PM2.5) exposure in people with asthma according to new research being presented at the 2024 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Meeting.
  • In the study, researchers identified six key driver genes for ozone and three key driver genes for PM2.5 exposure.
  • FGL2, previously reported as a master regulator of asthma, was the most upstream key driver for both ozone and PM2.5.
  • The findings suggest exposure to ozone and PM2.5 in individuals with asthma is associated with nasal key driver gene expression representing T-cell mediated immune processes.

Shamir Medical Center Reveals New Long-Term Results from Long COVID Study to Highlight Positive Impact on Symptoms Resulting from Hyperbaric Oxygen Therapy

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

In a previous randomized controlled trial, significant improvements in cognitive, psychiatric, fatigue, sleep, and pain symptoms among long COVID patients who underwent a unique protocol of hyperbaric oxygen therapy were documented.

Key Points: 
  • In a previous randomized controlled trial, significant improvements in cognitive, psychiatric, fatigue, sleep, and pain symptoms among long COVID patients who underwent a unique protocol of hyperbaric oxygen therapy were documented.
  • This longitudinal follow-up included 31 patients from the original study, who were treated with 40 daily sessions of HBOT.
  • The results indicate HBOT can improve the quality of life, quality of sleep, psychiatric and pain symptoms of patients suffering from long COVID.
  • By delivering high oxygen concentrations, HBOT can enhance oxygen delivery to tissues, resulting in recovery of injured tissues permanent improvement.

iNtRON, Development of PHAGERIA® Anti-Cancer Candidate with Enhanced Antimicrobial Activity by Robot Bacteriophage platform technology

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, February 15, 2024

BOSTON, Feb. 14, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- iNtRON Biotechnology ("iNtRON", www.intodeworld.com) has announced today that New Drug Part has secured a potent anti-cancer candidate, PHAGERIA®, with broad antimicrobial activity against ETBF (Enterotoxigenic B. fragilis), a harmful microbe associated with colorectal cancer.

Key Points: 
  • iNtRON stated that following the proprietary development of the Robot Bacteriophage 2nd generation technology, additional in-vitro evolution technology was applied.
  • The Company previously secured the technology to customize and edit bacteriophage genomes as desired using tailored CRISPR/Cas technology and Random Transposon Mutagenesis in 2022.
  • Recently, the Company has advanced this technology further to develop a more potent anti-cancer candidate, PHAGERIA®.
  • This achievement is significant as it is the first instance of applying in-vitro Evolution technology to ETBF bacteriophages, demonstrating the excellence of the bacteriophage gene editing technology (CRISPR/Cas) and Robotic Bacteriophage improvement platform technology of the Company.

Men become less fertile with age, but the same isn’t true for all animals – new study

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, February 14, 2024

But our recent study, which analysed data from 157 animal species, found that male reproductive ageing seems to be a lot less common in other male animals.

Key Points: 
  • But our recent study, which analysed data from 157 animal species, found that male reproductive ageing seems to be a lot less common in other male animals.
  • With fertility in men declining worldwide, understanding ageing of sperm in other animals could give new insights into our own fertility.

Humans versus other animals

  • This recent, rapid extension in our longevity might be one reason why humans reproductively age at faster rates than other animals.
  • Animals might also face greater evolutionary pressure to maximise their reproductive potential at all ages, because most animals reproduce throughout their lives.
  • But this isn’t the case for humans.

Females versus males

  • Despite the fact human females live longer than males, they tend to become infertile earlier than men, and go through menopause.
  • In some species, including humans, where females help raise their grand-offspring (such as humans and whales), females live much beyond the age of reproduction.
  • Sperm are continuously produced in males, but eggs in many species, including humans, are produced early in the life of females.
  • For instance, in many mammals, males, but not females, disperse away from the family group when they mature.

Patterns of reproductive ageing in animals

  • We found invertebrates such as crustacea and insects have some of the slowest rates of reproductive ageing, compared to lab rodents who had some of the fastest rates.
  • In animals such as lab rodents, who have some genetic lines selected for accelerated ageing, reproductive ageing was universal across ejaculate traits.
  • This suggests that a lot of the variation in male reproductive ageing between different species could be due to their environment.

Reproductive ageing

  • Reproductive ageing occurs because as individuals grow older, their sperm and eggs accumulate damage.
  • There are however, opposing forces that determine whether old individuals will leave more copies of their genes to successive lineages compared to young animals, and reproductive ageing is only one process determining this.
  • But by looking at other species to investigate the drivers of reproductive ageing, we can understand and perhaps even seek to alleviate our own reproductive decline with age.


Krish Sanghvi receives funding from Society for the study of evolution (Rosemary grant award). Irem Sepil receives funding from the Royal Society, BBSRC and Wellcome Trust. Regina Vega-Trejo receives funding from Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council.

Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy Provides $500,000 in Funding to Kinea Bio Through PPMD Venture Pathways Program to Support Next-Gen Midi-Dystrophin Gene Therapy Development

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2024

WASHINGTON, Feb. 13, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) , a nonprofit organization leading the fight to end Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) , is excited to announce that PPMD has provided $500,000 in funding to Kinea Bio, Inc. (Kinea) through PPMD Venture Pathways, the organization's venture philanthropy program which provides industry funding to accelerate therapeutic development.

Key Points: 
  • WASHINGTON, Feb. 13, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Parent Project Muscular Dystrophy (PPMD) , a nonprofit organization leading the fight to end Duchenne muscular dystrophy (Duchenne) , is excited to announce that PPMD has provided $500,000 in funding to Kinea Bio, Inc. (Kinea) through PPMD Venture Pathways, the organization's venture philanthropy program which provides industry funding to accelerate therapeutic development.
  • The organization prioritizes research for next-generation and future-generation gene therapies both through PPMD's Gene Therapy Initiative and the PPMD Venture Pathways program.
  • Casey Childers, DO, PhD, Chief Executive Officer of Kinea Bio, explains:
    "We are pleased to receive this funding commitment from PPMD.
  • In addition to PPMD's significant pre-clinical and academic research funding, the organization provides funding to biopharmaceutical companies through PPMD Venture Pathways, its venture philanthropy program.

Molecular Assemblies Announces the Appointment of Two Industry Leaders to Its Commercial-Technology Advisory Board

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, February 13, 2024

"With the deep knowledge, wisdom, and experience commercializing transformative life science products, the CTAB enables Molecular Assemblies to identify emerging opportunities and trends in the life sciences industry that can be solved with our breakthrough nucleic acid-based products," said Larry Stambaugh, Board Chair of Molecular Assemblies.

Key Points: 
  • "With the deep knowledge, wisdom, and experience commercializing transformative life science products, the CTAB enables Molecular Assemblies to identify emerging opportunities and trends in the life sciences industry that can be solved with our breakthrough nucleic acid-based products," said Larry Stambaugh, Board Chair of Molecular Assemblies.
  • "Molecular Assemblies is helping accelerate the life science industry by removing one of the largest bottlenecks in R&D – the availability of long, pure, accurate oligonucleotides," said Todd C. Peterson, Ph.D., CTAB Chair and MAI Board Director.
  • He is currently Founder and Principal at GenApex Bio, a life sciences Board service and advisory practice.
  • His extensive experience includes leadership roles at Sigma-Aldrich and Genome Systems, where he made significant contributions to the genomics field.