Defamation

Jury Awards $20 Million Verdict In Race Harassment Case Involving Ku Klux Klan-Related Threats at Stanford Medicine Cancer Center

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, June 19, 2024

After a seven-week trial, the jury found that Ms. Young was subjected to racial harassment, discrimination, whistleblower retaliation, and defamation.

Key Points: 
  • After a seven-week trial, the jury found that Ms. Young was subjected to racial harassment, discrimination, whistleblower retaliation, and defamation.
  • The jury awarded Ms. Young an additional $5.4 million against Stanford Health Care for defamation, and found that Stanford Health Care acted with malice, oppression, or fraud against Ms. Young.
  • The jury found that Stanford University was not Ms. Young's joint employer and awarded Ms. Young $5.6 million against Stanford University for defamation.
  • Stanford University and Stanford Health Care petitioned the trial court for a new trial and to set aside the jury's verdicts.

Norton Rose Fulbright enhances global investigations practice with 12-lawyer team

Retrieved on: 
Tuesday, June 11, 2024

St. Louis, MO, June 11, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Global law firm Norton Rose Fulbright announced today that its regulatory, investigations, securities and compliance practice has added a 12-lawyer team, highlighted by four new partners: Jeff Kalinowski, Eric Martin and Jeff Ziesman in St. Louis and Laura Perlov in Denver.

Key Points: 
  • St. Louis, MO, June 11, 2024 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Global law firm Norton Rose Fulbright announced today that its regulatory, investigations, securities and compliance practice has added a 12-lawyer team, highlighted by four new partners: Jeff Kalinowski, Eric Martin and Jeff Ziesman in St. Louis and Laura Perlov in Denver.
  • Jeff Cody, Norton Rose Fulbright’s US Managing Partner, said:
    “I am pleased that this remarkable group of lawyers has joined Norton Rose Fulbright, bringing robust practices and valuable experience which will greatly benefit our clients.
  • Their arrival expands our already strong global investigations offering, which will continue to be an area of growth over the coming years.”
    Sandeep Savla, Norton Rose Fulbright’s US Co-Head of Regulatory, Investigations, Securities and Compliance, commented:
    “Companies and their executives across many industries face heightened litigation risk amid increased regulatory scrutiny, and clients look to Norton Rose Fulbright for innovative guidance on these complex issues.
  • Norton Rose Fulbright provides a full scope of legal services to the world’s preeminent corporations and financial institutions.

An inquiry has recommended Australia legislate a Human Rights Act. Here’s why we need one

Retrieved on: 
Sunday, June 2, 2024

Australia is the only Western democracy that does not have a national Human Rights Act, but this may be about to change.

Key Points: 
  • Australia is the only Western democracy that does not have a national Human Rights Act, but this may be about to change.
  • After an inquiry lasting more than a year, the Parliamentary Joint Committee on Human Rights has just delivered its report to parliament.

A ‘patchwork quilt’ approach

  • Australia has a notoriously “patchwork quilt” approach to protecting human rights.
  • Our existing anti-discrimination laws do not provide adequate protection against government conduct that violates human rights.
  • A federal Human Rights Act in Australia would go a long way to fixing our current unequal and lopsided approach to protecting human rights.

International broken promises

  • It’s more than 40 years since Australia ratified the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights (ICCPR).
  • When the government committed to these two landmark international treaties (along with more than 170 other countries), it promised to implement these human rights laws in Australia.

What would a Human Rights Act look like?


Helpfully, the parliamentary committee’s report includes a model Human Rights Act the government can use as a draft bill. The model legislation includes important fundamental rights, currently not well protected in Australia, such as,
protection of children
protection of families
freedom of thought, conscience and religion
rights to culture
right to health
right to adequate standard of living
right to a healthy environment.

What difference would laws like this make?

  • Having a national Human Rights Act will not fix every human rights problem we have in Australia.
  • Having a Human Rights Act will make government more attuned to respecting human rights and more accountable for the consequences if it acts contrary to human rights.
  • This is because the proposed Human Rights Act allows reasonable and justifiable limits to be placed on rights.

So, will it actually happen?

Glass House Withdraws Defamation Suit, Citing Catalyst Financial Viability Concerns and Harassment Threats to Customers

Retrieved on: 
Monday, May 20, 2024

Glass House only conducts business with licensed operators and has no interest in subjecting its customers to similar harassment from Catalyst.

Key Points: 
  • Glass House only conducts business with licensed operators and has no interest in subjecting its customers to similar harassment from Catalyst.
  • While Glass House is confident it would prevail in its defamation litigation, it said it has grave concerns about the financial viability of Catalyst and its ability to pay a judgment.
  • Catalyst made clear that its intent was to then serve similarly invasive subpoenas on Glass House customers looking for diversion downstream, even if Glass House’s customers, like Glass House, had no knowledge of any such diversion.
  • Glass House said it believes this substantiates that Catalyst knows Glass House does not divert and instead that Catalyst is only interested in harassing Glass House’s customers.

Katten Attorneys Tapped to Participate in Leadership Council on Legal Diversity Career Development Programs

Retrieved on: 
Monday, April 29, 2024

CHICAGO, April 29, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Katten announced today that three attorneys — Partner Dilen Kumar and Associates Katie E. O'Brien and Christopher T. Vazquez — were selected for the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows and Pathfinder programs focused on professional development.

Key Points: 
  • CHICAGO, April 29, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Katten announced today that three attorneys — Partner Dilen Kumar and Associates Katie E. O'Brien and Christopher T. Vazquez — were selected for the Leadership Council on Legal Diversity (LCLD) Fellows and Pathfinder programs focused on professional development.
  • "These programs present a tremendous opportunity for our attorneys to develop new relationships with industry leaders, expand their leadership skills and continue the upward trajectory in their career paths," said Katten Chief Diversity Partner Leslie Minier.
  • "This group of high-achieving attorneys is not only committed to delivering industry-leading client service but also is deeply engaged in the firm's DEI efforts."
  • The seven-month-long Pathfinder program is designed to provide early-career attorneys with practical tools for developing and leveraging internal professional networks, leadership skills and an understanding of career development strategies.

Margaret M. Brady, Mitchell Klein, Steven J. Weissman, Lawrence H. Kotik and John E. DelGrosso Join Warshaw Burstein from Brady Klein & Weissman

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, April 11, 2024

NEW YORK, April 11, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Warshaw Burstein, LLP is pleased to announce the addition of five partners from the firm of Brady Klein & Weissman, LLP.

Key Points: 
  • NEW YORK, April 11, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Warshaw Burstein, LLP is pleased to announce the addition of five partners from the firm of Brady Klein & Weissman, LLP.
  • Margaret M. Brady , Mitchell Klein , Steven J. Weissman , Lawrence H. Kotik and John E. DelGrosso began practicing at Warshaw Burstein on April 1, 2024.
  • "We are very excited at the opportunity of our team joining a highly respected firm such as Warshaw Burstein," said Margaret M. Brady.
  • "This will be a seamless transition for our clients, while providing them with a broader suite of services."

New White Paper, 'Navigating Reputational Harm' by Eric W. Rose and James F. Haggerty Analyzes Managing Reputational Issues in the Digital Age

Retrieved on: 
Thursday, April 4, 2024

With a rise in false and defamatory content due to social media and the internet, managing a reputation has become increasingly difficult, presenting challenges to the traditional reputational response methods.

Key Points: 
  • With a rise in false and defamatory content due to social media and the internet, managing a reputation has become increasingly difficult, presenting challenges to the traditional reputational response methods.
  • This white paper features a comprehensive analysis on how to handle the growing challenges of repairing reputational damage in a media-driven era.
  • Haggerty and Rose add that "the difference between fact and opinion, which has traditionally been critical to defamation cases, has also blurred.
  • Indeed, this brave new world has changed, and will further change, the framework and cost-benefit analysis surrounding modern defamation law.

project44 Addresses Illinois Supreme Court Decision in project44 v. FourKites

Retrieved on: 
Friday, March 22, 2024

CHICAGO, March 22, 2024 /PRNewswire/ -- Yesterday, the Illinois Supreme Court issued a decision ruling in favor of project44 in its defamation lawsuit against competitor FourKites, concluding that emails sent to project44's Board of Directors and executives from fake Gmail accounts connected with FourKites were "published" and therefore could be pursued as defamation.

Key Points: 
  • This case began in 2019 when "anonymous" emails were sent to project44 Board members and executives making unfounded allegations of outrageous conduct without any evidence.
  • The emails were tied to phone numbers listed for a FourKites corporate entity and its CEO, Matt Elenjickal.
  • The issue in the case was whether sending these emails to project44's Board and executives was sufficient "publication" under Illinois defamation law.
  • Following the judgment, the case will be remanded back to the trial court with the new legal precedent applied.

A judgement in Bruce Lehrmann’s defamation trial against Network 10 has been delayed. What’s going on?

Retrieved on: 
Wednesday, April 3, 2024

Justice Michael Lee was to hand down his decision on the matter, which went to trial for a month last year, on Thursday morning.

Key Points: 
  • Justice Michael Lee was to hand down his decision on the matter, which went to trial for a month last year, on Thursday morning.
  • Lawyers for Network Ten were successful in convincing the Federal Court it should hear fresh evidence not raised during the trial.
  • Read more:
    A win for the press, a big loss for Ben Roberts-Smith: what does this judgment tell us about defamation law?

What happened in court?

  • Invariably, where there are conflicting testimonies, a judge has to make a determination about whose evidence is to be preferred.
  • To challenge it, the defendants applied to the court to reopen the case, and they were successful yesterday.
  • As it happened, Justice Lee was satisfied the new evidence, if credible, would be fresh and compelling.
  • If Auerbach does give evidence, it is likely Lehrmann himself will take the stand again to give his response to these anticipated revelations.

Will this make a difference to the outcome?

  • The evidence, if accepted, will weigh heavily into the credibility of the testimonies of those who have given evidence, especially that of Lehrmann, and the crucial findings of fact in the case.
  • Lehrmann’s criminal rape trial ended in October 2022 when Australian Capital Territory Chief Justice Lucy McCallum determined there had been juror misconduct.

Trials through a camera lens

  • Lehrmann launched his defamation case against Network Ten and Wilkinson safe in the knowledge that no adverse finding had been made against him in the criminal trial.
  • The onus is on the defendants to successfully claim one of the defences to defamation, in this case, contextual truth.
  • Network Ten needs this new evidence to push home its case that contextual truth has been established.


Rick Sarre does not work for, consult, own shares in or receive funding from any company or organisation that would benefit from this article, and has disclosed no relevant affiliations beyond their academic appointment.

Top court: No letup in anti-cyberbullying battle

Retrieved on: 
Friday, March 8, 2024

Zhang added, "This increasingly serious cyberbullying makes people worry about being victimized, whether online or offline, polluting the online environment and disrupting social order."

Key Points: 
  • Zhang added, "This increasingly serious cyberbullying makes people worry about being victimized, whether online or offline, polluting the online environment and disrupting social order."
  • Such specific rules will help prosecutors play a bigger role in combating cyberbullying, giving stronger support to victims, Zhang said.
  • "These provisions aim to help create a safer online environment to guarantee the public sense of security," Zhang said.
  • Tragedies caused by online misconduct have caused public outrage and prompted cyberspace agencies and internet platforms to take action, in addition to courts.